dictionar englez roman

acknowledgment


4 dicționare găsite pentru acknowledgment
Din dicționarul The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

  Acknowledgment \Ac*knowl"edg*ment\, Acknowledgement
  \Ac*knowl"edge*ment\ ([a^]k*n[o^]l"[e^]j*ment), n.
     1. The act of acknowledging; admission; avowal; owning;
        confession. "An acknowledgment of fault." --Froude.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. The act of owning or recognizing in a particular character
        or relationship; recognition as regards the existence,
        authority, truth, or genuineness; a statement
        acknowledging something or someone.
        [1913 Webster +WordNet 1.5]
  
              Immediately upon the acknowledgment of the Christian
              faith, the eunuch was baptized by Philip. --Hooker.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. The owning of a benefit received; courteous recognition;
        the state or quality of being recognized or acknowledged;
        an expression of thanks. --Shak.
  
     Syn: recognition
          [1913 Webster +WordNet 1.5]
  
     4. Something given or done in return for a favor, message,
        etc. --Smollett.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     5. A declaration or avowal of one's own act, to give it legal
        validity; as, the acknowledgment of a deed before a proper
        officer. Also, the certificate of the officer attesting
        such declaration.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Acknowledgment money, in some parts of England, a sum paid
        by copyhold tenants, on the death of their landlords, as
        an acknowledgment of their new lords. --Cowell.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Syn: Confession; concession; recognition; admission; avowal;
          recognizance.
          [1913 Webster]

Din dicționarul WordNet (r) 2.0 :

  acknowledgment
       n 1: the state or quality of being recognized or acknowledged;
            "the partners were delighted with the recognition of
            their work"; "she seems to avoid much in the way of
            recognition or acknowledgement of feminist work prior to
            her own" [syn: recognition, acknowledgement]
       2: a short note recognizing a source of information or of a
          quoted passage; "the student's essay failed to list
          several important citations"; "the acknowledgments are
          usually printed at the front of a book"; "the article
          includes mention of similar clinical cases" [syn: citation,
           credit, reference, mention, quotation]
       3: a statement acknowledging something or someone; "she must
          have seen him but she gave no sign of acknowledgment";
          "the preface contained an acknowledgment of those who had
          helped her" [syn: acknowledgement]

Din dicționarul Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 :

  152 Moby Thesaurus words for "acknowledgment":
     abject apology, acceptance, acknowledgments, acquittance,
     admission, allowance, answer, answering, antiphon, apology,
     appreciation, avowal, back, back answer, back matter, back talk,
     backchat, bastard title, benediction, bibliography, billet, blurb,
     boost, breast-beating, buildup, business letter, by-line,
     canceled check, catch line, catchword, chit, citation, cognizance,
     colophon, comeback, commendation, communication, concession,
     confession, contents, contents page, contrition, copyright page,
     credit, credit line, crediting, declaration, dedication, discharge,
     dispatch, due, echo, endleaf, endpaper, endsheet, epistle, errata,
     evasive reply, excuse, favor, flyleaf, folio, fore edge, foreword,
     front matter, good word, grace, half-title page, head,
     honorable mention, hymn, hype, imprint, index, inscription,
     introduction, leaf, letter, line, makeup, mea culpa, message,
     missive, note, owning, owning up, paean, page, penitence, plug,
     praise, prayer of thanks, preface, preliminaries, profession,
     promotion, puff, quittance, reaction, ready reply, receipt,
     receipt in full, recognition, recto, reference, regrets, rejoinder,
     release, repartee, replication, reply, repost, rescript,
     rescription, respondence, response, responsion, responsory, retort,
     return, reverberation, reverso, right, riposte, rite of confession,
     running title, short answer, shrift, signature, snappy comeback,
     subtitle, table of contents, tail, text, thank offering, thank-you,
     thanks, thanksgiving, title, title page, trademark, tribute,
     trim size, type page, unbosoming, verso, voucher, warrant,
     what is owing, witty reply, witty retort, yes-and-no answer  
     
Din dicționarul Bouvier's Law Dictionary, Revised 6th Ed (1856) :

  ACKNOWLEDGMENT, conveyancing. The act of the grantor going before a
  competent officer, and declaring the instrument to be his act or deed, and
  desiring the same to be recorded as such. The certificate of the officer on
  the instrument, that such a declaration has been made to him, is also called
  an acknowledgment. The acknowledgment or due proof of the instrument by
  witnesses, must be made before it can be put upon record.
       2. Below will be found the law of the several states relating to the
  officer before whom the acknowledgment must be made.  Justice requires that
  credit should be here given for the valuable information which has been
  derived on this subject from Mr. Hilliard's Abridgment of the American Law
  of Real Property, and from Griffith's Register.  Much valuable information
  has also been received on this subject from the correspondents of the
  author.
       3. Alabama. Before one of the judges of the superior court, or any one
  of the justices of the county court; Act of March 3, 1803; or before any one
  of the superior judges or justices of the quorum of the territory (state);
  Act of Dec. 12, 1812; or before the clerks of the circuit and county courts,
  within their respective counties; Act of Nov. 21, 1818; or any two justices
  of the peace; Act of Dec. 17, 1819; or clerks of the circuit courts, for
  deeds conveying lands anywhere in the state; Act of January 6, 1831; or
  before any notary public, Id, sec. 2; or before one justice of the peace;
  Act of January 5, 1836; or before  the clerks of the county courts; Act of
  Feb. 1, 1839; See Aiken's Dig. 88, 89, 90, 91, 616; Meek's Suppl. 86.
       4. When the acknowledgment is out of the state, in one of the United
  States or territories thereof, it may be made before the chief justice or
  any associate judge of the supreme court of the United States, or any judge
  or or justice of the superior court of any state, or territory in the Union.
  Aiken's Dig. 89.
       5. When it is made out of the United States, it may be made before and
  certified by any court of law, mayor or other chief magistrate of any city,
  borough or corporation of the kingdom, state, nation, or colony, where it is
  made. Act of March 3,1803.
       6. When a feme covert is a grantor, the officer must certify that she
  was examined "separately and apart from her said husband and that on such
  private examination, she acknowledged that she signed, sealed and delivered
  the deed as her voluntary act and deed, freely and without any threat, fear,
  or compulsion, of her said husband."
       7. Arkansas. The proof or acknowledgment of every deed or instrument of
  writing for the conveyance of real estate, shall be taken by some one of the
  following courts or officers: 1. When acknowledged or proven within this
  state, before the supreme court, the circuit court, or either of the judges
  thereof, or of the clerk of either of the said courts, or before the county
  court, or the judge thereof, or before an justice of the peace or notary
  public.
       8.-2. When acknowledged or proven without this state, and within the
  United States or their territories, before any court of the United States,
  or of any state or territory having a seal, or the clerk of any such court,
  or before the mayor of any city or town, or the chief officer of any city or
  town having a seal of office.
       9.-3.When acknowledged or proven  without the United States, before
  any court of any state, kingdom or empire having a seal, or any mayor or
  chief officer of any city or town having an official seal, or before any,
  officer of any foreign country, who by the laws of such country, is
  authorized to take probate of the conveyance of real estate of his own
  country, if such officer has by law an official seal.
      10. The conveyance of any real estate by any married woman, or the
  relinquishment of her dower in any of her husband's real estate, shall be
  authenticated, and the title passed, by such married woman voluntarily
  appearing before the proper court or officer, and, in the absence of her
  husband, declaring that she had of her own free will executed the deed or
  instrument in question, or that she had signed and sealed the relinquishment
  of dower for the purposes therein contained and set forth, without any
  compulsion or undue influence of her husband. Act of Nov. 30, 1837, s. 13,
  21; Rev. Stat. 190, 191.
      11. In cases of acknowledgment or proof of deeds or conveyances of real
  estate taken within the United States or territories thereof, when taken
  before a court or officer, having a seal of office, such deed or conveyance
  shall be attested under such seal of office; and if such officer have no
  seal of office, then under the official signature of such officer, Idem, s.
  14; Rev. Stat. 190.
      12. In all cases of deeds, and conveyances proven or acknowledged
  without the United States or their territories, such acknowledgment or proof
  must be attested under the official seal of the court or officer before whom
  such probate is had. Idem, s. 15.
      13. Every court or officer that shall take the proof or acknowledgment
  of any deed or conveyance of real estate, or the relinquishment of dower of
  any married woman in any conveyance of the estate of her husband, shall
  grant a certificate thereof, and cause such certificate to be endorsed on
  the said deed, instrument, conveyance or relinquishment of dower, which
  certificate shall be signed by the clerk of the court where the probate is
  taken in court, or by the officer before whom the same is taken and sealed,
  if he have a seal of office. Idem, s. 16.
      14. Connecticut. In this state, deeds must be acknowledged before a
  judge of the supreme or district court of the United States, or the supreme
  or superior court, or court of common pleas or county court of this state,
  or a notary public.
      15. When the acknowledgment is made in another state or territory of the
  United States, it must be before some officer or commissioner having power
  to take acknowledgments there.
      16. When made out of the United States before a resident American
  consul, a justice of the peace, or notary public, no different form is used,
  and no different examination of a feme covert from others. See Act of 1828;
  Act of 1833; 1 Hill. Ab. c. 34, s. 82.
      17. Delaware. Before the supreme court, or the court of common pleas of
  any county, or a judge of either court, or the chancellor, or two justices
  of the peace of the same county.
      18. The certificate of an acknowledgment in court must be under the seal
  of the court.
      19. A feme covert may also make her acknowledgment before the same
  officers, who are to examine her separately from her husband.
      20. An acknowledgment out of the state, may be made before a judge of
  any  court of the United States, the chancellor or judge of a court of
  record, of the said court itself, or the chief officer of a city or borough,
  the certificate to be under the official seal; if by a judge, the seal to be
  affixed to his certificate, or to that of the clerk or keeper of the seal.
  Commissioners appointed in other states may also take acknowledgments. 2
  Hill. Ab. 441 ; Griff. Reg. h.t.
      21. Florida. Deeds and mortgages must be acknowledged within the state
  before the officer authorized by law to record the same, or before some
  judicial officers of this state. Out of the state, but within some other
  state or territory of the United States, before a commissioner of Florida,
  appointed under the act passed January 24, 1831; and where there is no
  commissioner, or he is unable to attend) before the chief justice, judge,
  presiding judge, or president of any court of record of the United States or
  of any state or territory thereof having a seal and a clerk or prothonotary.
  The certificate must show, first, that the acknowledgment was taken within
  the territorial jurisdiction of the officer; secondly, the court of which he
  is such officer.  And it must be accompanied by the certificate of the clerk
  or prothonotary of the court of which he is judge, justice or president,
  under the seal of said court that he is duly appointed and authorized as
  such.  Out of the United States.  If in Europe, or in North or South
  America, before. any minister plenipotentiary, or minister extraordinary, or
  any charge d'affaires, or consul of the United States, resident or
  accredited there.  If in any part of Great Britain and Ireland, or the
  dominions thereunto belonging, before the consul of the United States,
  resident or accredited therein, or before the mayor or other chief
  magistrate of London, Bristol, Liverpool, Dublin or Edinburgh, the
  certificate to be under the hand and seal of the officer.  In any other
  place out of the United States, where there is no public minister, consul or
  vice consul, commercial agent or vice commercial agent of the United States,
  before two subscribing witnesses and officers of such place, and the
  identity of such civil officer and credibility, shall be certified by a
  consul or vice consul of the United States, of the government of which such
  place is a part.
      22. The certificate of acknowledgment of a married, woman must state
  that she was examined apart from her husband, that she executed such deeds,
  &c., freely and without any fear or compulsion of her husband.
      23. Georgia. Deeds of conveyance of land in the state must be executed
  in the presence of two witnesses, and proved before a justice of the peace,
  a justice of the inferior court, or one of the judges of the superior
  courts.  If executed in the presence of one witness and a magistrate, no
  probate is required. Prince's Dig. 162; 1 Laws of Geo. 115.
      24. When out of the state, but in the United States, they may be proved
  by affidavit of one or more of the witnesses thereto, before any governor,
  chief justice, mayor, or other justice, of either of the United States, and
  certified accordingly, and transmitted under the common or public seal of
  the state, court, city or place, where the same is taken.  The affidavit
  must express the place of the affiant's abode. Idem.
      25. There is no state law, directing how the acknowledgment shall be
  made when it is made out of the United States.
      26. By an act of the legislature passed in 1826, the widow is barred, of
  her dower in all lands of her deceased husband, that he aliens or conveys
  away during the coverture, except such lands as he acquired by his
  intermarriage with his wife; So that no relinquishment of dower by the wife
  is necessary, unless the lands came to her husband by her. Prince's Dig.249;
  4 Laws of Geo. 217. The magistrate should certify that the wife did declare
  that freely, and without compulsion, she signed, sealed and delivered the
  instrument of writing between the parties, naming them and that she did
  renounce all title or claim to dower that she might claim or be entitled to
  after death of her husband, (naming him.) 1 Laws of. Geo. 112; Prince's Dig.
  160.
      27. Indiana. Before the recorder of the county in which the lands may,
  be situate, or one of the judges of the supreme court of this state, or
  before one of the judges of the circuit court, or some justice of the peace
  of the county within which the estate may be situate, before notaries
  public, or before probate judges. Ind. Rev. Stat. c. 44, s. 7; Id. eh. 74;
  Act of Feb. 24, 1840.
      28. All deeds and conveyances made and executed by any person without
  this state and brought within it to be recorded, the acknowledgment having
  been lawfully made before any judge or justice of the peace of the proper
  county in which such deed may have been made and executed, and certified
  under the seal of such county by the proper officer, shall be valid and
  effectual in law. Rev. Code, c. 44, s. 11 App. Jan. 24, 1831.
      29. When acknowledged by a feme covert, it must be certified that she
  was examined separate and apart from her husband; that the full contents of
  the deed were made known to her; that she did then and there declare that
  she had, as her own voluntary act and deed, signed, sealed and executed the
  said deed of her own free will and accord, without any fear or compulsion
  from her said husband.
      30. Illinois. Before a judge or justice of the supreme or district
  courts of the United States, a commissioner authorized to take
  acknowledgments, a judge or justice of the supreme, superior or district
  court of any of the United States or territories, a justice of the peace,
  the clerk of a court of record, mayor of a city, or notary public; the last
  three shall give a certificate under their official seal.
      31. The certificate must state that the party is known to the officer,
  or that his identity has been proved by a credible witness, naming him. When
  the acknowledgment is taken by a justice of the peace of the state, residing
  in the county where the lands lie, no other certificate is required than his
  own; when he resides in another county, there shall be a certificate of the
  clerk of the county commissioners court of the proper county, under seal, to
  his official capacity.
      32. When the justice of the peace taking the acknowledgment resides out
  of the state, there shall be added to the deed a certificate of the proper
  clerk, that the person officiating is a justice of the peace.
      33. The deed of a feme covert is acknowledged before the same officers.
  The certificate must state that she is known to the officer, or that her
  identity has been proved by a witness who must be named; that the officer
  informed her of the contents of the deed; that she was separately examined;
  that she acknowledged the execution and release to be made freely,
  voluntarily, and without the compulsion of her husband.
      34. When the husband and wife reside in the state, and the latter is
  over eighteen years of age, she may convey her lands, with formalities
  substantially the same as those used in a release of dower; she acknowledges
  the instrument to be her act and deed, and that she does not wish to
  retract.
      35. When she resides out of the state, if over eighteen, she may join
  her husband in any writing relating to lands in the state, in which case her
  acknowledgment is the same as if she were a feme sole. Ill. Rev. L. 135-8; 2
  Hill Ab. 455, 6.
      36. Kentucky. Acknowledgments taken in the State must be before the
  clerk of a county court, clerk of the general court, or clerk of the court
  of appeals.  4 Litt. L. of K. 165 ; or before two justices of the peace, 1
  Litt. L. of K. 152.; or before the mayor of the city of Louisville. Acts of
  1828, p. 219, s. 12.
      37. When in another state or territory of the United States, before two
  justices of the peace, 1 Litt. L. of K. 152; or before any court of law,
  mayor, or other chief magistrate of any city, town or corporation of the
  county where the grantors dwell, Id. 567; or before any justice or judge of
  a superior or inferior court of law. Acts of 1831, p. 128.
      38. When made out of the United States, before a mayor of a city, or
  consul of the U. S. residing there' or, before the chief, magistrate of such
  state or country, to be authenticated in the usual manner such officers
  authenticate the official act's. Acts of 1831, p. 128, s. 5.
      39. When a feme covert acknowledges the deed, the certificate must state
  that she was examined by the officer separate and apart from her husband,
  that she declared that she did freely and willingly seal and deliver the
  said writing, and wishes not to retract it, and acknowledged the said
  writing again shown and explained to her, to be her act and deed, and
  consents that the same may be recorded.
      40. Maine. Before a justice of the peace in this state, or any justice
  of the peace, magistrate, or notary public, within the United States, or any
  commissioner appointed for that purpose by the governor of this state, or
  before any minister or consul of the United States, or notary public in any
  foreign country. Rev. St. t. 7, c. 91, 7; 6 Pick. 86.
      41. No peculiar form for the certificate of acknowledgment is
  prescribed; it is required that the husband join in the deed. "The joint
  deed of husband and wife shall be effectual to convey her real estate, but
  not to bind her to any covenant or estoppel therein." Rev. St. t. 7, c. 91,
  Sec. 5.
      42. Maryland. Before two justices of the peace of the county where the
  lands lie, or where the grantor lives, or before a judge of the county court
  of the former county, or the mayor of Annapolis for Anne Arundel county.
  When the acknowledgment is made in another county than that in which the
  lands are situated, an in which the party Eves, the clerk of the court must
  certify under the court seal, the official capacity of the acting justices
  or judge.
      43. When the grantor resides out of the state, a commission issues on,
  application of the purchaser, and with the written consent of the grantor,
  from the clerk of the county court where the land lies, to two or more
  commissioners at the grantee's residence; any two of whom may take the
  acknowledgment, and shall certify it under seal and return the commission to
  be recorded with the deed; or the grantor may empower an attorney in the
  state to acknowledge for him, the power to be incorporated in the deed, or
  annexed to it, and proved by a subscribing witness before the county court,
  or two justices of the peace where the land lies, or a district judge, or
  the governor or a mayor, notary public, court or judge thereof, of the place
  where it is executed; in each case the certificate to be under an official
  seal.  By the acts of 1825, c. 58, and 1830, c. 164 the acknowledgment in
  another state may be before a judge of the U. S. or a judge of a court of
  record of the state. and county where the grantor may be the clerk to
  certify under seal, the official character of the magistrate.
      44. By the act of 1837, c. 97, commissioners may be appointed by
  authority of the state, who shall reside in the other states or territories
  of the United States who shall be authorized to take acknowledgment of
  deeds.  The act of 1831, c. 205, requires that the officer shall certify
  knowledge of the parties.
      45. The acknowledgment of a feme covert must be made separate and apart
  from her husband. 2 Hill. Ab. 442; Griff. Reg. h.t. See also, 7 Gill & J.
  480; 2 Gill. & J. 173 6 Harr. & J. 336; 3 Harr. & J.371 ; 1 Harr. & J. 178;
  4 Harr. & M'H. 222.
      46. Massachusetts. Before a justice of the peace or magistrate out of
  the state.  It has been held that an American consul at a foreign port, is a
  magistrate. 13 Pick. R. 523.  An acknowledgment by one of two grantors has
  been held, sufficient to authorize the registration of a deed; and a wife
  need not, therefore, acknowledge the conveyance when she joins with her
  husband. 2 Hill. Ab. c. 34, s. 45.
      47. Michigan. Before a judge of a court of record, notary public,
  justice of the peace, or master in chancery; and in case of the death of the
  grantor, or his departure from the state, it may be proved by one of the
  subscribing witnesses before any court of record in the state. Rev. St. 208
  Laws of 1840, p. 166.
      48. When, the deed is acknowledged out of the state of Michigan, but in
  the United States, or an of the territories of the U. S., it is to be
  acknowledged according to the laws of such state or territory, with a
  certificate of the proper county clerk, under his seal of office, that such
  deed is executed according to the laws of such state or territory, attached
  thereto.
      49. When acknowledged in a foreign country, it may be executed according
  to the laws of such foreign country, but, it must in such. case, be
  acknowledged before a minister plenipotentiary, consul, or charge
  d'affaires of the United States and the acknowledgment must be certified by
  the officer before whom the same was taken. Laws of 1840, p. 166, sec. 2 and
  3.
      50. When the acknowledgment is made by a feme covert, the certificate
  must state that on a private examination of such feme' covert, separate and
  apart from her husband, she acknowledged that she executed the deed without
  fear or compulsion from any one. Laws of 1840, p. 167, sec. 4.
      51. Mississippi. When in the state, deeds may be acknowledged, or proved
  by one or more of the subscribing witnesses to them, before any judge of the
  high court of errors and appeals, or a judge of the circuit courts, or judge
  of probate, and certified by such judge; or before any notary public, or
  clerk of any court of record in this state, and certified by such notary or
  clerk under the seal of his office; How. & Hutch. c. 34, s. 99, p. 868, Law
  of 1833 ; or before any justice of that county, where the land, or any part
  thereof, is situated; Ib. p. 343, s. 1, Law of 1822; or before any, member
  of the board of police, in his respective county. Ib. p. 445, c. 38, s. 50,
  Law of 1838.
      52. When in another state or territory of the United States, such deeds
  must be acknowledged, or proved as aforesaid, before a judge of the supreme
  court or of the district courts of the United States, or before any judge of
  the supreme or superior court of any state or territory in the Union; How. &
  Hutch. 846) c. 34, s. 13, Law of 1832; or before and certified by any judge
  of any inferior or county court of record, or before any justice of the
  peace of the state or territory and county, wherein such person or witness
  or witnesses may then be or reside, and authenticated by the certificate of
  the clerk or register of the superior county or circuit court of such
  county, with a seal of his office thereto affixed; or if taken before or
  certified by a justice of the peace, shall be authenticated by the
  certificate of either the clerk of the Said inferior or county court of
  record of such county, with the seal of his office thereto affixed. Laws of
  Mississippi, Jan. 27, 1841, p. 132.
      53. When out of the United States, such acknowledgment, or proof as,
  aforesaid, must be made before an court of law, or mayor, or other chief
  magistrate of any city, borough or corporation of such foreign kingdom,
  state, nation, or colony, in which the said parties or witnesses reside;
  certified by the court, mayor, or chief magistrate, in a manner such acts
  are usually authenticated by him. How. & Hutch, 346, c. 34, s. 14, Law of
  1822.
      54. When made by a feme covert, the certificate must state that she made
  previous acknowledgment, on a private examination, apart from her husband
  before the proper officer, that she sealed and delivered the same as her act
  and deed, freely, without any fear, threat or compulsion of her husband.
  How. & Hutch. 347, c. 34, s. 19, Law of 1822.
      55. Missouri. In the state, before some court having a seal, or some
  judge, justice or clerk thereof, or a justice of the peace in the county
  where the land lies. Rev. Code, 1835, Sec. 8, p. 120.
      56. Out of the state, but in the United States, before any court of the
  United States, or of any state or territory, having a seal, or the clerk
  thereof. Id. cl. 2.
      57. Out of the United States, before any court of any state, kingdom or
  empire having a seal, or the mayor of any city having an official seal.
      58. Every court or officer taking the acknowledgment of such instrument
  or relinquishment of dower or the deed of the wife of the husband's land,
  shall endorse a certificate thereof upon the instrument; when made before a
  court, the certificate shall be under its seal; if by a clerk, under his
  band and the seal of the court; when before an officer having an official
  seal, under his hand and seal; when by an officer having no seal, under his
  hand. The certificate must state that the party was personally known to the
  judge or other officer as the signer, or proved to be such by two credible
  witnesses. Misso. St. 120-122 ; 2 Hill. Ab. 453; Griff. h.t.
      59. When the acknowledgment is made by a feme covert, releasing her
  dower, the certificate must state that she is personally known to a judge of
  the court, or the officer before whom the deed is acknowledged, or that, her
  identity was proved by two credible witnesses; it must also state that she
  was informed of the contents of the deed; that it was acknowledged separate
  and apart from her husband; that she releases her dower freely without
  compulsion or undue conveyance of her own lands, the acknowledgment may be
  made before any court authorized to take acknowledgments.  It must be done
  as in the cases of release of dower, and have a similar certificate. Ib.
      60. New Hampshire. Before a justice of the peace or a notary public; and
  the acknowledgment of a deed before a notary public in another state is
  good. 2 N. H. Rep. 420 2 Hill. Ab. c. 34, s. 61.
      61. New Jersey. In the state, before the chancellor, a justice of the
  supreme court of this state, a master in chancery, or a judge of any
  inferior court of common pleas, whether in the same or a different county;
  Rev. Laws, 458, Act of June 7, 1799 ; or before a commissioner for taking
  the acknowledgments or proofs of deeds, two of whom are appointed by the
  legislature in each township, who are authorized to take acknowledgments or
  proofs of deeds in any part of the state. Rev. Laws, 748, Act of June 5,
  1820.
      62. In another state or territory of the United States, before a judge
  of the supreme court of the United States, or a district judge of the United
  States, or any judge or justice of the supreme or superior court of any
  state in the Union; Rev. Laws, 459, Act of June 7, 1799; or before a mayor
  or other chief magistrate of any city in any other state or territory of the
  U. S., and duly certified under the seal of such city; or before a judge of
  any, superior court, or court of common pleas of any state or territory;
  when, taken before a judge of a court of common pleas, it must be
  accompanied by a certificate under the great seal of the state, or the seal
  of the county court in which it is made, that he is such officer; Rev. Laws,
  747, Act of June 5, 1820; or before a commissioner appointed by the
  governor, who resides in such state; Harr. Comp. 158, Act of December 27,
  1826; two of whom may be appointed for each of the States of New York and
  Pennsylvania. Elmer's Dig. Act of  Nov. 3, 1836.
      63. When made out of the United States, the acknowledgment may be before
  any court of law, or mayor, or other magistrate, of any city, borough or
  corporation of a foreign kingdom, state, nation or colony, in which the
  party or his witnesses reside, certified by the said court, mayor, or chief
  magistrate, in the manner in which such acts are usually authenticated by
  him. Rev. Laws, 459, Act of June 7, 1799.  The certificate in all cases must
  state that the officer who makes it, first made known the contents of the
  deed to the person making the acknowledgment, and that he was satisfied such
  person was the grantor mentioned in the deed.Rev. Laws, 749, Act of June 5,
  1820.
      64. When the acknowledgment is made by a feme covert, the certificate
  must state that on a private examination, apart from her husband, before a
  proper officer, (ut supra,) she acknowledged that she signed, sealed, and
  delivered the deed, as her voluntary act and deed, freely, without any fear,
  threats or compulsion of her husband. Rev. Laws, 459, Act of June 7, 1799..
      65. New York. Before the chancellor or justice of the supreme court,
  circuit judge, supreme court commissioner, judge of the county court, mayor
  or recorder of a city, or, commissioner of deeds; a county judge or
  commissioner of deeds for a city or county, not to act out of the same.
      66. When the party resides in another state, before a judge of the
  United States, or a judge or justice of the supreme, superior or circuit
  court of any state or territory of the United States, Within his own
  jurisdiction.  By a statute passed in 1840, chap. 290, the governor is
  authorized to appoint commissioners in other states, to take the
  acknowledgment and proof of deeds and other instruments.
      67. When the party is in Europe or other parts of America, before a
  resident minister or charge d'affaires of the United States; in France,
  before the United States consul at Paris; in Russia, before the same officer
  at St. Petersburg; in the British dominions, before the Lord Mayor of
  London, the chief magistrate of Dublin, Edinburgh, or Liverpool, or the
  United States consul at London. The certificate to be under the hand and
  official seal of such officer. It may also be made before any person
  specially authorized by the court of chancery of this state.
      68. The officer must in all cases be satisfied of the identity of the
  party, either from his own knowledge or from the oath or affirmation of a
  witness, who is to be named in the certificate.
      69. A feme covert must be privately examined; but if out of the state
  this is unnecessary. 2 Hill. Ab. 434; Griff. Reg. h.t.
      70. By the act passed April 7, 1848, it is provided, that: Sec. 1. The
  proof or acknowledgment of any deed or other written, instrument required to
  be proved or acknowledged, in order to entitle the same to be recorded or
  read in evidence, when made by any person residing out of this state and
  within any  other state or territory of the United States, may be made
  before any officer of such state or territory, authorized by the laws
  thereof to take the proof and acknowledgment of deeds and when so taken and
  certified as by the act is provided, shall be entitled to be recorded in any
  county in this state, and may be read in evidence in any court in this
  state, in the same manner and with like effect, as proofs and
  acknowledgments taken before any of the officers now authorized by law to
  take such proofs and acknowledgments: Provided that no such acknowledgment
  shall be valid unless the officer taking the same shall know or have
  satisfactory evidence that the person making such acknowledgment is the
  individual described in, and who executed the deed or instrument.
      71.-2. To entitle any conveyance or other written instrument
  acknowledged or proved under the preceding section, to be read in evidence
  or recorded in this state, there shall be subjoined to the certificate of
  proof or acknowledgment, signed by such officer, a certificate under the
  name and official seal of the clerk or register of the county in which such
  officer resides, specifying that such officer was at the time of taking such
  proof or acknowledgment, duly authorized to take the same, and that such
  clerk or register is well acquainted with the handwriting of such officer,
  and verily believes that the signature to said certificate of proof and
  acknowledgment, is genuine.
      72. North Carolina. The acknowledgment or proof of deeds for the
  conveyance of lands, when taken or made in the state, must be before one of
  the judges of the supreme court, or superior court, or in the court of the
  county where the land lieth. 1 Itev. Stat. c. 37, s.. 1.
      73. When in another state or territory of the United States, or the
  District of Columbia, the deed must be acknowledged, or proved, before some
  one of the judges of the superior courts of law, or circuit courts of law of
  superior jurisdiction, within the said state, &c., with a certificate of the
  governor of the said state or territory, or of the secretary of state of the
  United States, when in the District of Columbia, of the official character
  of the judge; or before a commissioner appointed by the governor of this
  state according to law. 1 Rev. Stat. c. 37, s. 5.
      74. When out of the United States, the deeds must be acknowledged, or
  proved, before the chief magistrate of some city, town, or corporation of
  the countries where the said deeds were executed; or before some ambassador,
  public minister, consul, or commercial agent, with proper certificate under
  their official seals; 1 Rev. Stat. c. 37 s. 6. and 7; or before a
  commissioner in such foreign country, under a commission from the county
  court where the land lieth. See. 8.
      75. When acknowledged by a feme covert, the certificate must state that
  she was privily examined by the proper officer, that she acknowledged the
  due execution of the deed, and declared that she executed the same freely,
  voluntarily, and without the fear or compulsion of her husband, or any other
  person, and, that she then assented thereto.  When she is resident of
  another county, or so infirm that she cannot travel to the judge, or county
  court, the deed may be acknowledged by the husband, or proved by witnesses,
  and a commission in a prescribed form may be issued for taking the
  examination of the wife. 1 Rev. Stat. c. 37, s. 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, and 14.
      76. Ohio. In the state, deeds and other instruments affecting lands must
  be acknowledged before a judge of the supreme court, a judge of the court of
  common pleas, a justice of the peace, notary public, mayor, or other
  presiding officer of an incorporated town or city. Ohio Stat. vol. 29, p.
  346, Act of February 22, 1831, which went in force June 1, 1831 Swan's Coll.
  L. 266, s. 1.
      77. When made out of the state, whether in another state or territory,
  or out of the U. S., they must be acknowledged, or proved, according to the
  laws of the state, territory or country, where they are executed, or
  according to the laws of the state of Ohio. Swan's Coll. L. 265, 8. 5.
      78. When made by a feme covert, the certificate must state that she was
  examined by the officer, separate and apart from her husband, and the
  contents of the deed were fully made known to her; that she did declare upon
  such separate examination, that she voluntarily sign, seal, and acknowledge
  the same, and that she is still satisfied therewith.
      79. Pennsylvania. Before a judge of the supreme court, or of the courts
  of common pleas, the district courts, or before any mayor or alderman, or
  justice of the peace of the commonwealth, or before the recorder of the city
  of Philadelphia.
      80. When made out of the state, and within the United States, the
  acknowledgment may be before one of the judges of the supreme or district
  courts of the United States, or before an one of the judges or justices of
  the supreme or superior courts, or courts of common pleas of any state or
  territory within the United States; and so certified under the hand of the
  said judge, and the seal of the court.  Commissioners appointed by the
  governor, residing in either of the United States or of the District of
  Columbia, are also authorized to take acknowledgment of deeds.
      81. When made out of the United States, the acknowledgment may, be made
  before any consul or vice-consul of the United States, duly appointed for
  and exercising consular functions in the state, kingdom, country or place
  where such an acknowledgment may be made, and certified under the public or
  official seal of such consul or vice-consul of the United States.  Act of
  January 16, 1827.  By the act May 27th, 1715, s. 4, deeds made out of the
  province [state] may be proved by the oath or solemn affirmation of one or
  more of the witnesses thereunto, before one or more of the justices of the
  peace of this province [state], or before any mayor or chief magistrate or
  officer of the cities, towns or places, where such deed or conveyances are
  so proved. The proof must be certified by the officer under the common or
  public seal of the cities, towns, or places where such conveyances are so
  proved.  But by construction it is now established that a deed acknowledged
  before such officer is valid, although the act declares it shall be proved.
  1 Pet. R. 433.
      82. The certificate of the acknowledgment of a feme covert must state,
  1, that she is of full age; 2, that the contents of the instrument have been
  made known to her; 3, that she has been examined separate and apart from her
  husband; and, 4, that she executed the deed of her own free will and accord,
  without any coercion or compulsion of her husband.  It is the constant
  practice of making the certificate, under seal, though if it be merely under
  the hand of the officer, it will be sufficient. Act of Feb. 19, 1835.
      83. By the act of the 16th day of April, 1840, entitled "An act
  incorporating the Ebenezer Methodist Episcopal congregation for the borough
  of Reading, and for other purposes," Pamph. Laws, 357, 361, it is provided
  by Sec. 15, "That any and every grant, bargain and sale, release, or other
  deed of conveyance or assurance of any lands, tenements, or hereditaments in
  this commonwealth, heretofore bona fide made, executed and delivered by
  husband and wife within any other of the United States, where the
  acknowledgment of the execution thereof has been taken, and certified by any
  officer or officers in any of the states where made and executed, who, was,
  or were authorized by the laws of such state to take and certify the
  acknowledgment of deeds of conveyance of lands therein, shall be deemed and
  adjudged to be as good, valid and effectual in law for transferring, passing
  and conveying the estate, right, title and interest of such husband and wife
  of, in, and to the lands; tenements and hereditaments therein mentioned, and
  be in like manner entitled to be recorded, as if the acknowledgment of the
  execution of the same deed had been in the same and like way, manner and
  form taken and certified by any judge, alderman, or justice of the peace, of
  and within this commonwealth. Sec. 16. That no grant, bargain and sale,
  feoffment, deed of conveyance, lease, release, assignment, or other
  assurance of any lands, tenements and hereditaments whatsoever, heretofore
  bona fide made and executed by husband and wife, and acknowledged by them
  before some judge, justice of the peace, alderman, or other officer
  authorized by law, within this state, or an officer in one of the United
  
  States, to take such acknowledgment, or which may be so made, executed and
  acknowledged as aforesaid, before the first day of January next, shall be
  deemed, held or adjudged, invalid or, defective, or insufficient in law, or
  avoided or prejudiced, by reason of any informality or omission in setting
  forth the particulars of the acknowledgment made before such officer, as
  aforesaid, in the certificate thereof, but all and every such grant, bargain
  and sale, feoffment, deed of conveyance, lease, release, assignment or other
  assurance so made, executed and acknowledged as aforesaid, shall be as good,
  valid and effectual in law for transferring, passing and conveying the
  estate, right, title and interest of such husband and wife of, in, and to
  the lands, tenements and hereditaments mentioned in the same, as if all the
  requisites and particulars of such acknowledgment mentioned in the act,
  entitle an act for the better confirmation of the estates of persons holding
  or claiming under feme coverts, and for establishing a mode by which husband
  and wife may hereafter convey their estates, passed the twenty-fourth day of
  February, one thousand seven hundred and seventy, were particularly set
  forth in the certificate thereof, or appeared upon the face of the same."
     84. By the act of the 3d day of April, 1840, Pamph. L. 233, it is
  enacted, "That where any deed, conveyance, or other instrument of writing
  has been or shall be made and executed, either within or out of this state,
  and the acknowledgment or proof thereof, duly certified, by any officer
  under seal, according to the existing laws of this commmonwealth, for the
  purpose of being recorded therein, such certificate shall be deemed prima
  facie evidence of such execution and acknowledgment, or proof, without
  requiring proof of the said seal, as fully, to all intents and purposes, and
  with the same effect only, as if the same had been so acknowledged or proved
  before any judge, justice of the peace, or alderman within this
  commonwealth."
     85. The act relating to executions and for other purposes, passed 16th
  April, 1840, Pamph. L. 412, enacts, Sec. 7, " That the recorders of deeds
  shall have authority to take the acknowledgment and proof of the execution
  of any deed, mortgage, or other conveyance of any lands, tenements, or
  hereditaments lying or being in the county, for which they are respectively
  appointed as recorders of deeds, or within every city, district, or part
  thereof, or for any contract, letter of attorney, or any other writing,
  under seal, to be used or recorded within their respective counties and such
  acknowledgment or proof, taken or made in the manner directed by the laws of
  this state, and certified by the said recorder, under his hand and seal of
  office; which certificate shall be endorsed or annexed to said deed or
  instrument aforesaid, shall have the same force and effect, and be as good
  and available in law, for all purposes, as if the same had been made or
  taken before any judge of the supreme court, or president or associate judge
  of any of the courts of common pleas within this commonwealth."
     86. Rhode Island. Before any senator, judge, justice of the peace, or
  town clerk. When the acknowledgment is made in another state or country, it
  must be before a judge, justice, mayor or, notary public therein, and
  certified under his hand and seal.
     87. A wife releasing dower need not acknowledge the deed; but to a
  conveyance an acknowledgment and private examination are necessary. 2 Hill.
  Ab. c. 34, s. 94.
     88. South Carolina. Before a judge of the supreme court. A feme covert
  may release her dower or convey her own estate, by joining with her hushand
  in a deed, and being privately examined, in the latter case, seven days
  afterwards, before a judge of law or equity, or a justice of the quorum; she
  may also release dower by a separate deed.
     89. The certificate of the officer is under seal and signed by the woman.
  Deeds may be proved upon the oath of one witness before a magistrate, and
  this is said to be the general practice.
     90. When the deed is to be executed out of the state, the justices of the
  county where the land lies, or a judge of the court of common pleas, may by
  dedimus empower two or more justices of the county where the grantor
  resides, to take his acknowledgment upon the oath of two witnesses to the
  execution. 2 Hill. Ab. 448, 9; Griff. Reg. b. t.
     91. Tennessee. A deed or power of attorney to convey land must be
  acknowledged or proved by two subscribing witnesses, in the court of the
  county, or the court of the district where the land lies. The certificate of
  acknowledgment must be endorsed upon the deed by the clerk of the court.
     93. The acknowledgment of a feme covert is made before a court of record
  in the state, or, if the parties live out of it, before a court of record iu
  another state or territory; and if the wife is unable to attend court, the
  acknowledgment may be before commissioners empowered by the court of the
  county in which the husband acknowledges the commission to be returned
  certified with the court seal, and recorded.
     94. In all these cases the certificate must state that the wife has been
  privately examined. The seal of the court is to be annexed when the deed is
  to be used out of the state, when made in it, and vice versa; in which case
  there is to be a seal and a certificate of the presiding judge or justice to
  the official station, of the clerk, and the due formality of the
  attestation. By the statute of 1820, the acknowledgment in other states may
  be conformable to the laws of the state, in which the grantor resides.
     95. By the act of 1831, c, 90, s. 9, it is provided, that all deeds or
  conveyances for land made without the limits of this state, shall be proved
  as heretofore, or before a notary public under his seal of office. Caruthers
  & Nicholson's Compilation of the Stat. of Tenn. 593.
     96. The officer must certify that he is acquainted with the grantor, and
  that he is an inhabitant of the state. There must also be a certificate of
  the governor or secretary under the great seal, or a judge of the superior
  court that the acknowledgment is in due form. Griff. Reg. h.t.; 2 Hill. Ab.
  458.
     97. By an act passed during the session of 1839-1840, chap. 26, it is
  enacted, "1. That deeds of every description may be proved by two
  subscribing witnesses, or acknowledged and recorded, and may then be read in
  evidence. 2. That deeds executed beyond the limits of the United States may
  be proved or acknowledged before a notary public, or before any consul,
  minister, or ambassador of the United States, or before a commissioner of
  the state. 3. That the govornor may appoint commissioners in other states
  and in foreign countries for the proof, &c. of deeds. 4. Affidavits taken as
  above, as to pedigree or heirship, may be received as evidence, by executors
  or administrators, or in regard to the partition and distribution of
  property or estates." See 2 Yerg. 91, 108, 238, 400, 520; 3 Yerg. 81; Cooke,
  431.
     98. Vermont. 1. All deeds and other conveyances of lands, or any estate
  or interest therein, shall be signed and sealed by the party granting the
  same, and signed by two or more witnesses, and acknowledged by the grantor,
  before a justice of the peace. Rev. Stat. tit. 14, c. 6, s. 4.
     99. Every deed by the husband and wife shall contain an acknowledgment by
  the wife, made apart from her husband, before a judge of the supreme court,
  a judge of the county court, or some justice of the peace, that she executed
  such conveyance freely, and without any fear or compulsion of her husband; a
  certificate of which acknowledgment, so taken, shall be endorsed on the deed
  by the authority taking the same. Id. s. 7.
    100.-2. All deeds and other conveyances, and powers of attorney for the
  conveyance of lands, the acknowledgment or proof of which shall have been,
  or hereafter shall be taken without this state, if certified agreeably to
  the laws of the state, province, or kingdom in which it was taken, shall be
  as valid as though the same were taken before some proper officer or court,
  within this state; and the proof of the same may be taken, and the same
  acknowledged with like effect, before any justice of the peace, magistrate,
  or notary public, within the United States, or in any foreign country, or
  before any commissioner appointed for that purpose by the governor of this
  state, or before any minister, charge d'affaires, or consul of the United
  States in any foreign country and the acknowledgment of a deed a feme in the
  form required by covert, by this chapter may be taken by either of the said
  persons Id. 9.
    101. Virginia. Before the general court, or the court of the district,
  county, city, or corporation where some part of the land lies; when the
  party lives out of the state or of the district or county where the land
  lies, the acknowledgment may be before any court of law, or the chief
  magistrate of any city, town, or corporation of the country where the party
  resides, and certified by him in the usual form.
    102. When a married woman executes the deed, she appears in court and is
  examined privately by one of the judges, as to her freely signing the
  instrument, and continuing satisfied with it, the deed being shown and
  explained to her. She acknowledges the deed before the court, or else before
  two justices of the county where she dwells, or the magistrate of a
  corporate town, if she lives within the United States; these officers being
  empowered by a commission from the clerk of the court where the deed, is to
  be recorded, to examine her and to take her acknowledgment. If she is out of
  the United States, the commission authorizes two judges or justices of any
  court of law, or the chief magistrate of any city, town, or corporation, in
  her county, and is executed as by two justices in the United States.
    103. The certificate is to be authenticated in the usual form. 2 Hill. Ab.
  444, 5; Griff. Reg. h.t.; 2 Leigh's R, 186; 2 Call. R. 103 ; 1 Wash. R.
  319.
  
  

Caută acknowledgment cu Omnilexica

Produse referitoare la "acknowledgment"

Contact | Noutăți | Unelte gratuite

Acest site este bazat pe Lexica © 2004-2020 Lucian Velea

www.ro-en.ro trafic.ro

 
Poți promova cultura română în lume: Intră pe www.intercogito.ro și distribuie o cugetare românească într-o altă limbă!